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статья День гнева в Москве

Евгения Михеева, 26.10.2008

Субботний "День народного гнева" получился не слишком массовым. В Москве организаторам не удалось вывести на Триумфальную площадь обещанную тысячу человек. Отставки Юрия Лужкова требовала разношерстная компания - от коммунистов до оборонцев. Смотрите наш фоторепортаж и видео.


Комментарии
(написано анонимно) 26.10.2008 19:08 (#)

красные фашисты, какие же они мерзкие

фу!

(написано анонимно) 27.10.2008 11:57 (#)

Abramovich, Deripaska, Oligarchs Lose $230 Billion (Update1) By Yuriy Oct. 10 -- Russian billionaires from aluminum magnate Oleg Deripaska to soccer-club owner Roman Abramovich lost more than $230 billion in five months during the nation's worst financial crisis since the 1998 default on its debt. The combined wealth of Forbes magazine's 25 richest Russians tumbled 62 percent between May 19 and Oct. 6, based on the equity value of traded companies and analysts' estimates of closely held assets they own. The loss is four times larger than the fortune of the world's wealthiest man, Warren Buffett. Moscow's benchmark Micex stock index declined 61 percent since its peak in May. The global credit seizure, war with Georgia and falling commodity prices led foreign investors to pull $74 billion out of Russia since early August, according to BNP Paribas SA. While Russia's 1998 default and devaluation of the ruble eradicated savings for most of the population, this year's losses are wiping out its richest citizens' fortunes. ``There was a massive transfer of wealth into the hands of the oligarchs in 1998,'' said Mark Mobius, executive chairman of Templeton Asset Management Ltd., which has about $30 billion in emerging market stocks. ``Now it's going the other way.'' United Co. Rusal's Deripaska, 40, the richest Russian on the list, lost more than $16 billion and in the past week ceded stakes in Hochtief AG and Magna International Inc. Chelsea FC owner and Evraz Group SA shareholder Abramovich, 41, lost $20 billion, based on assets excluding property and cash. Lisin's Losses The biggest loser has been Vladimir Lisin, 52, an avid hunter and head of Russia's Shooting Club, whose 85 percent stake in OAO Novolipetsk Steel lost $22 billion in value in the period. Novolipetsk rival Evraz declined 83 percent, shrinking 49- year-old founder Alexander Ambramov's fortune to $2.2 billion from $13.4 billion. Russia's biggest steelmaker, OAO Severstal, also fell, cutting the wealth of chief executive officer and majority owner Alexei Mordashov, 43, to $5.3 billion. ``They should take us all off the Forbes list,'' said Alexander Lebedev, ranked 39th by the magazine in May with $3.1 billion of wealth. Lebedev, 49, who owns 30 percent of state-run airline OAO Aeroflot, said in an interview on Sept. 23 that ``silly'' rhetoric by the Kremlin over the conflict in Georgia was responsible for 40 percent of the stock market's drop in August. Lukoil, Alfa OAO Lukoil Chief Executive Officer Vagit Alekperov, 58, saw his 20 percent stake in Russia's second-biggest oil producer decline to $7.2 billion from $19.5 billion. The fortune of Alekperov deputy Leonid Fedun, 52, declined to $3 billion from $8.4 billion. Both men have said they will continue to buy more Lukoil shares. Dmitry Rybolovlev, 41, who controls OAO Uralkali and owns 20 percent of OAO Silvinit, the country's only potash producers, lost about $12.8 billion, leaving him with $4.1 billion. Alfa Group partners Mikhail Fridman, 44, German Khan, 46, and Alexei Kousmichoff, 45, ranked seventh, 10th and 17th, respectively, lost at least a combined $12.1 billion. Alfa's shareholdings include BP Plc's Russian oil venture TNK-BP, mobile-phone operators OAO VimpelCom and Turkey's Turkcell Iletisim Hizmetleri AS, supermarket chain X5 Retail Group and television broadcaster CTC Media Inc. Spokespeople for companies including Deripaska's Basic Element, Evraz, Nikolai Tsvetkov's UralSib Financial Corp. and Rybolovlev's Uralkali declined to comment on the losses. Cashing Out At least one of Russia's wealthiest got out in time. Mikhail Prokhorov, 43, sold his 25 percent stake in OAO GMK Norilsk Nickel to Deripaska's Rusal for an undisclosed amount in April, just before nickel prices began to slump. The value of that stake plummeted from $13 billion on April 24 to $3.38 billion on Oct. 6. Prokhorov received $7 billion in cash as part of the Norilsk transaction, the Kommersant and Vedomosti newspapers reported then, citing unidentified people familiar with the deal. ``Are you criticizing me for feasting amid the Black Death,'' Prokhorov joked with reporters in Moscow on Sept. 30, after buying half of Renaissance Capital for $500 million. That was less than a quarter of the value the investment bank had a year ago when VTB Group sought to take it over, according to a Vedemosti report. ``Crisis time is a peak for opportunities,'' Prokhorov said. ``An absolute peak.'' Trading Delayed Russia's Micex and RTS stock exchanges delayed the opening of trading today on orders of the market regulator. It was unclear when trading would start, a spokesman for Micex said. The RTS won't resume stock trading until ``further notice,'' the bourse wrote in an e-mailed statement. ``You can now buy the free float of the entire Russian energy sector with the market cap of Coca-Cola, and still have change to buy all the Russian banks,'' Merrill Lynch & Co. emerging markets equity strategist Michael Hartnett said in a note to clients today. The unprecedented loss of wealth may set the stage for a new round of asset redistribution, said Pavel Teplukhin, president of Troika Dialog Asset Management in Moscow. ``We've seen quite a significant inflow of fresh money by our wealthy individuals to acquire at these very attractive levels that we haven't seen since 2003, 2004,'' Teplukhin said in a Bloomberg Television interview on Oct. 9, a day the Micex Index climbed 9.8 percent. Next Round The next round of wealth building may be the most intense yet, according to Renaissance Capital. The first came between 1995 and 1998 as Russia's first president, the late Boris Yeltsin, agreed to sell stakes in the nation's biggest industrial assets in return for loans from bankers including Potanin, who helped organize the state bailout. ``It will be a game with bigger stakes than in early 1990s privatizations and the redistribution after the 1998 crisis,'' said David Aserkoff, chief strategist for Russia at Moscow-based Renaissance Capital. ``Oligarchs with cash will be able to use their knowledge of the business and political landscape to find the next billions,'' Aserkoff said in a research report on Oct. 6. ``The market will grow back,'' billionaire Viktor Vekselberg, 51, one of BP Plc's four partners in oil company TNK-BP and founder of Renova Group, told reporters yesterday. ``The only issue is when. I don't think it will be soon.'' Abramovich, Deripaska, Oligarchs Lose $230 Billion (Update1) By Yuriy Oct. 10 -- Russian billionaires from aluminum magnate Oleg Deripaska to soccer-club owner Roman Abramovich lost more than $230 billion in five months during the nation's worst financial crisis since the 1998 default on its debt. The combined wealth of Forbes magazine's 25 richest Russians tumbled 62 percent between May 19 and Oct. 6, based on the equity value of traded companies and analysts' estimates of closely held assets they own. The loss is four times larger than the fortune of the world's wealthiest man, Warren Buffett. Moscow's benchmark Micex stock index declined 61 percent since its peak in May. The global credit seizure, war with Georgia and falling commodity prices led foreign investors to pull $74 billion out of Russia since early August, according to BNP Paribas SA. While Russia's 1998 default and devaluation of the ruble eradicated savings for most of the population, this year's losses are wiping out its richest citizens' fortunes. ``There was a massive transfer of wealth into the hands of the oligarchs in 1998,'' said Mark Mobius, executive chairman of Templeton Asset Management Ltd., which has about $30 billion in emerging market stocks. ``Now it's going the other way.'' United Co. Rusal's Deripaska, 40, the richest Russian on the list, lost more than $16 billion and in the past week ceded stakes in Hochtief AG and Magna International Inc. Chelsea FC owner and Evraz Group SA shareholder Abramovich, 41, lost $20 billion, based on assets excluding property and cash. Lisin's Losses The biggest loser has been Vladimir Lisin, 52, an avid hunter and head of Russia's Shooting Club, whose 85 percent stake in OAO Novolipetsk Steel lost $22 billion in value in the period. Novolipetsk rival Evraz declined 83 percent, shrinking 49- year-old founder Alexander Ambramov's fortune to $2.2 billion from $13.4 billion. Russia's biggest steelmaker, OAO Severstal, also fell, cutting the wealth of chief executive officer and majority owner Alexei Mordashov, 43, to $5.3 billion. ``They should take us all off the Forbes list,'' said Alexander Lebedev, ranked 39th by the magazine in May with $3.1 billion of wealth. Lebedev, 49, who owns 30 percent of state-run airline OAO Aeroflot, said in an interview on Sept. 23 that ``silly'' rhetoric by the Kremlin over the conflict in Georgia was responsible for 40 percent of the stock market's drop in August. Lukoil, Alfa OAO Lukoil Chief Executive Officer Vagit Alekperov, 58, saw his 20 percent stake in Russia's second-biggest oil producer decline to $7.2 billion from $19.5 billion. The fortune of Alekperov deputy Leonid Fedun, 52, declined to $3 billion from $8.4 billion. Both men have said they will continue to buy more Lukoil shares. Dmitry Rybolovlev, 41, who controls OAO Uralkali and owns 20 percent of OAO Silvinit, the country's only potash producers, lost about $12.8 billion, leaving him with $4.1 billion. Alfa Group partners Mikhail Fridman, 44, German Khan, 46, and Alexei Kousmichoff, 45, ranked seventh, 10th and 17th, respectively, lost at least a combined $12.1 billion. Alfa's shareholdings include BP Plc's Russian oil venture TNK-BP, mobile-phone operators OAO VimpelCom and Turkey's Turkcell Iletisim Hizmetleri AS, supermarket chain X5 Retail Group and television broadcaster CTC Media Inc. Spokespeople for companies including Deripaska's Basic Element, Evraz, Nikolai Tsvetkov's UralSib Financial Corp. and Rybolovlev's Uralkali declined to comment on the losses. Cashing Out At least one of Russia's wealthiest got out in time. Mikhail Prokhorov, 43, sold his 25 percent stake in OAO GMK Norilsk Nickel to Deripaska's Rusal for an undisclosed amount in April, just before nickel prices began to slump. The value of that stake plummeted from $13 billion on April 24 to $3.38 billion on Oct. 6. Prokhorov received $7 billion in cash as part of the Norilsk transaction, the Kommersant and Vedomosti newspapers reported then, citing unidentified people familiar with the deal. ``Are you criticizing me for feasting amid the Black Death,'' Prokhorov joked with reporters in Moscow on Sept. 30, after buying half of Renaissance Capital for $500 million. That was less than a quarter of the value the investment bank had a year ago when VTB Group sought to take it over, according to a Vedemosti report. ``Crisis time is a peak for opportunities,'' Prokhorov said. ``An absolute peak.'' Trading Delayed Russia's Micex and RTS stock exchanges delayed the opening of trading today on orders of the market regulator. It was unclear when trading would start, a spokesman for Micex said. The RTS won't resume stock trading until ``further notice,'' the bourse wrote in an e-mailed statement. ``You can now buy the free float of the entire Russian energy sector with the market cap of Coca-Cola, and still have change to buy all the Russian banks,'' Merrill Lynch & Co. emerging markets equity strategist Michael Hartnett said in a note to clients today. The unprecedented loss of wealth may set the stage for a new round of asset redistribution, said Pavel Teplukhin, president of Troika Dialog Asset Management in Moscow. ``We've seen quite a significant inflow of fresh money by our wealthy individuals to acquire at these very attractive levels that we haven't seen since 2003, 2004,'' Teplukhin said in a Bloomberg Television interview on Oct. 9, a day the Micex Index climbed 9.8 percent. Next Round The next round of wealth building may be the most intense yet, according to Renaissance Capital. The first came between 1995 and 1998 as Russia's first president, the late Boris Yeltsin, agreed to sell stakes in the nation's biggest industrial assets in return for loans from bankers including Potanin, who helped organize the state bailout. ``It will be a game with bigger stakes than in early 1990s privatizations and the redistribution after the 1998 crisis,'' said David Aserkoff, chief strategist for Russia at Moscow-based Renaissance Capital. ``Oligarchs with cash will be able to use their knowledge of the business and political landscape to find the next billions,'' Aserkoff said in a research report on Oct. 6. ``The market will grow back,'' billionaire Viktor Vekselberg, 51, one of BP Plc's four partners in oil company TNK-BP and founder of Renova Group, told reporters yesterday. ``The only issue is when. I don't think it will be soon.'' Abramovich, Deripaska, Oligarchs Lose $230 Billion (Update1) By Yuriy Oct. 10 -- Russian billionaires from aluminum magnate Oleg Deripaska to soccer-club owner Roman Abramovich lost more than $230 billion in five months during the nation's worst financial crisis since the 1998 default on its debt. The combined wealth of Forbes magazine's 25 richest Russians tumbled 62 percent between May 19 and Oct. 6, based on the equity value of traded companies and analysts' estimates of closely held assets they own. The loss is four times larger than the fortune of the world's wealthiest man, Warren Buffett. Moscow's benchmark Micex stock index declined 61 percent since its peak in May. The global credit seizure, war with Georgia and falling commodity prices led foreign investors to pull $74 billion out of Russia since early August, according to BNP Paribas SA. While Russia's 1998 default and devaluation of the ruble eradicated savings for most of the population, this year's losses are wiping out its richest citizens' fortunes. ``There was a massive transfer of wealth into the hands of the oligarchs in 1998,'' said Mark Mobius, executive chairman of Templeton Asset Management Ltd., which has about $30 billion in emerging market stocks. ``Now it's going the other way.'' United Co. Rusal's Deripaska, 40, the richest Russian on the list, lost more than $16 billion and in the past week ceded stakes in Hochtief AG and Magna International Inc. Chelsea FC owner and Evraz Group SA shareholder Abramovich, 41, lost $20 billion, based on assets excluding property and cash. Lisin's Losses The biggest loser has been Vladimir Lisin, 52, an avid hunter and head of Russia's Shooting Club, whose 85 percent stake in OAO Novolipetsk Steel lost $22 billion in value in the period. Novolipetsk rival Evraz declined 83 percent, shrinking 49- year-old founder Alexander Ambramov's fortune to $2.2 billion from $13.4 billion. Russia's biggest steelmaker, OAO Severstal, also fell, cutting the wealth of chief executive officer and majority owner Alexei Mordashov, 43, to $5.3 billion. ``They should take us all off the Forbes list,'' said Alexander Lebedev, ranked 39th by the magazine in May with $3.1 billion of wealth. Lebedev, 49, who owns 30 percent of state-run airline OAO Aeroflot, said in an interview on Sept. 23 that ``silly'' rhetoric by the Kremlin over the conflict in Georgia was responsible for 40 percent of the stock market's drop in August. Lukoil, Alfa OAO Lukoil Chief Executive Officer Vagit Alekperov, 58, saw his 20 percent stake in Russia's second-biggest oil producer decline to $7.2 billion from $19.5 billion. The fortune of Alekperov deputy Leonid Fedun, 52, declined to $3 billion from $8.4 billion. Both men have said they will continue to buy more Lukoil shares. Dmitry Rybolovlev, 41, who controls OAO Uralkali and owns 20 percent of OAO Silvinit, the country's only potash producers, lost about $12.8 billion, leaving him with $4.1 billion. Alfa Group partners Mikhail Fridman, 44, German Khan, 46, and Alexei Kousmichoff, 45, ranked seventh, 10th and 17th, respectively, lost at least a combined $12.1 billion. Alfa's shareholdings include BP Plc's Russian oil venture TNK-BP, mobile-phone operators OAO VimpelCom and Turkey's Turkcell Iletisim Hizmetleri AS, supermarket chain X5 Retail Group and television broadcaster CTC Media Inc. Spokespeople for companies including Deripaska's Basic Element, Evraz, Nikolai Tsvetkov's UralSib Financial Corp. and Rybolovlev's Uralkali declined to comment on the losses. Cashing Out At least one of Russia's wealthiest got out in time. Mikhail Prokhorov, 43, sold his 25 percent stake in OAO GMK Norilsk Nickel to Deripaska's Rusal for an undisclosed amount in April, just before nickel prices began to slump. The value of that stake plummeted from $13 billion on April 24 to $3.38 billion on Oct. 6. Prokhorov received $7 billion in cash as part of the Norilsk transaction, the Kommersant and Vedomosti newspapers reported then, citing unidentified people familiar with the deal. ``Are you criticizing me for feasting amid the Black Death,'' Prokhorov joked with reporters in Moscow on Sept. 30, after buying half of Renaissance Capital for $500 million. That was less than a quarter of the value the investment bank had a year ago when VTB Group sought to take it over, according to a Vedemosti report. ``Crisis time is a peak for opportunities,'' Prokhorov said. ``An absolute peak.'' Trading Delayed Russia's Micex and RTS stock exchanges delayed the opening of trading today on orders of the market regulator. It was unclear when trading would start, a spokesman for Micex said. The RTS won't resume stock trading until ``further notice,'' the bourse wrote in an e-mailed statement. ``You can now buy the free float of the entire Russian energy sector with the market cap of Coca-Cola, and still have change to buy all the Russian banks,'' Merrill Lynch & Co. emerging markets equity strategist Michael Hartnett said in a note to clients today. The unprecedented loss of wealth may set the stage for a new round of asset redistribution, said Pavel Teplukhin, president of Troika Dialog Asset Management in Moscow. ``We've seen quite a significant inflow of fresh money by our wealthy individuals to acquire at these very attractive levels that we haven't seen since 2003, 2004,'' Teplukhin said in a Bloomberg Television interview on Oct. 9, a day the Micex Index climbed 9.8 percent. Next Round The next round of wealth building may be the most intense yet, according to Renaissance Capital. The first came between 1995 and 1998 as Russia's first president, the late Boris Yeltsin, agreed to sell stakes in the nation's biggest industrial assets in return for loans from bankers including Potanin, who helped organize the state bailout. ``It will be a game with bigger stakes than in early 1990s privatizations and the redistribution after the 1998 crisis,'' said David Aserkoff, chief strategist for Russia at Moscow-based Renaissance Capital. ``Oligarchs with cash will be able to use their knowledge of the business and political landscape to find the next billions,'' Abramovich, Deripaska, Oligarchs Lose $230 Billion (Update1) By Yuriy Oct. 10 -- Russian billionaires from aluminum magnate Oleg Deripaska to soccer-club owner Roman Abramovich lost more than $230 billion in five months during the nation's worst financial crisis since the 1998 default on its debt. The combined wealth of Forbes magazine's 25 richest Russians tumbled 62 percent between May 19 and Oct. 6, based on the equity value of traded companies and analysts' estimates of closely held assets they own. The loss is four times larger than the fortune of the world's wealthiest man, Warren Buffett. Moscow's benchmark Micex stock index declined 61 percent since its peak in May. The global credit seizure, war with Georgia and falling commodity prices led foreign investors to pull $74 billion out of Russia since early August, according to BNP Paribas SA. While Russia's 1998 default and devaluation of the ruble eradicated savings for most of the population, this year's losses are wiping out its richest citizens' fortunes. ``There was a massive transfer of wealth into the hands of the oligarchs in 1998,'' said Mark Mobius, executive chairman of Templeton Asset Management Ltd., which has about $30 billion in emerging market stocks. ``Now it's going the other way.'' United Co. Rusal's Deripaska, 40, the richest Russian on the list, lost more than $16 billion and in the past week ceded stakes in Hochtief AG and Magna International Inc. Chelsea FC owner and Evraz Group SA shareholder Abramovich, 41, lost $20 billion, based on assets excluding property and cash. Lisin's Losses The biggest loser has been Vladimir Lisin, 52, an avid hunter and head of Russia's Shooting Club, whose 85 percent stake in OAO Novolipetsk Steel lost $22 billion in value in the period. Novolipetsk rival Evraz declined 83 percent, shrinking 49- year-old founder Alexander Ambramov's fortune to $2.2 billion from $13.4 billion. Russia's biggest steelmaker, OAO Severstal, also fell, cutting the wealth of chief executive officer and majority owner Alexei Mordashov, 43, to $5.3 billion. ``They should take us all off the Forbes list,'' said Alexander Lebedev, ranked 39th by the magazine in May with $3.1 billion of wealth. Lebedev, 49, who owns 30 percent of state-run airline OAO Aeroflot, said in an interview on Sept. 23 that ``silly'' rhetoric by the Kremlin over the conflict in Georgia was responsible for 40 percent of the stock market's drop in August. Lukoil, Alfa OAO Lukoil Chief Executive Officer Vagit Alekperov, 58, saw his 20 percent stake in Russia's second-biggest oil producer decline to $7.2 billion from $19.5 billion. The fortune of Alekperov deputy Leonid Fedun, 52, declined to $3 billion from $8.4 billion. Both men have said they will continue to buy more Lukoil shares. Dmitry Rybolovlev, 41, who controls OAO Uralkali and owns 20 percent of OAO Silvinit, the country's only potash producers, lost about $12.8 billion, leaving him with $4.1 billion. Alfa Group partners Mikhail Fridman, 44, German Khan, 46, and Alexei Kousmichoff, 45, ranked seventh, 10th and 17th, respectively, lost at least a combined $12.1 billion. Alfa's shareholdings include BP Plc's Russian oil venture TNK-BP, mobile-phone operators OAO VimpelCom and Turkey's Turkcell Iletisim Hizmetleri AS, supermarket chain X5 Retail Group and television broadcaster CTC Media Inc. Spokespeople for companies including Deripaska's Basic Element, Evraz, Nikolai Tsvetkov's UralSib Financial Corp. and Rybolovlev's Uralkali declined to comment on the losses. Cashing Out At least one of Russia's wealthiest got out in time. Mikhail Prokhorov, 43, sold his 25 percent stake in OAO GMK Norilsk Nickel to Deripaska's Rusal for an undisclosed amount in April, just before nickel prices began to slump. The value of that stake plummeted from $13 billion on April 24 to $3.38 billion on Oct. 6. Prokhorov received $7 billion in cash as part of the Norilsk transaction, the Kommersant and Vedomosti newspapers reported then, citing unidentified people familiar with the deal. ``Are you criticizing me for feasting amid the Black Death,'' Prokhorov joked with reporters in Moscow on Sept. 30, after buying half of Renaissance Capital for $500 million. That was less than a quarter of the value the investment bank had a year ago when VTB Group sought to take it over, according to a Vedemosti report. ``Crisis time is a peak for opportunities,'' Prokhorov said. ``An absolute peak.'' Trading Delayed Russia's Micex and RTS stock exchanges delayed the opening of trading today on orders of the market regulator. It was unclear when trading would start, a spokesman for Micex said. The RTS won't resume stock trading until ``further notice,'' the bourse wrote in an e-mailed statement. ``You can now buy the free float of the entire Russian energy sector with the market cap of Coca-Cola, and still have change to buy all the Russian banks,'' Merrill Lynch & Co. emerging markets equity strategist Michael Hartnett said in a note to clients today. The unprecedented loss of wealth may set the stage for a new round of asset redistribution, said Pavel Teplukhin, president of Troika Dialog Asset Management in Moscow. ``We've seen quite a significant inflow of fresh money by our wealthy individuals to acquire at these very attractive levels that we haven't seen since 2003, 2004,'' Teplukhin said in a Bloomberg Television interview on Oct. 9, a day the Micex Index climbed 9.8 percent. Next Round The next round of wealth building may be the most intense yet, according to Renaissance Capital. The first came between 1995 and 1998 as Russia's first president, the late Boris Yeltsin, agreed to sell stakes in the nation's biggest industrial assets in return for loans from bankers including Potanin, who helped organize the state bailout. ``It will be a game with bigger stakes than in early 1990s privatizations and the redistribution after the 1998 crisis,'' said David Aserkoff, chief strategist for Russia at Moscow-based Renaissance Capital. ``Oligarchs with cash will be able to use their knowledge of the business and political landscape to find the next billions,'' Aserkoff said in a research report on Oct. 6. ``The market will grow back,'' billionaire Viktor Vekselberg, 51, one of BP Plc's four partners in oil company TNK-BP and founder of Renova Group, told reporters yesterday. ``The only issue is when. I don't think it will be soon.''Abramovich, Deripaska, Oligarchs Lose $230 Billion (Update1) By Yuriy Oct. 10 -- Russian billionaires from aluminum magnate Oleg Deripaska to soccer-club owner Roman Abramovich lost more than $230 billion in five months during the nation's worst financial crisis since the 1998 default on its debt. The combined wealth of Forbes magazine's 25 richest Russians tumbled 62 percent between May 19 and Oct. 6, based on the equity value of traded companies and analysts' estimates of closely held assets they own. The loss is four times larger than the fortune of the world's wealthiest man, Warren Buffett. Moscow's benchmark Micex stock index declined 61 percent since its peak in May. The global credit seizure, war with Georgia and falling commodity prices led foreign investors to pull $74 billion out of Russia since early August, according to BNP Paribas SA. While Russia's 1998 default and devaluation of the ruble eradicated savings for most of the population, this year's losses are wiping out its richest citizens' fortunes. ``There was a massive transfer of wealth into the hands of the oligarchs in 1998,'' said Mark Mobius, executive chairman of Templeton Asset Management Ltd., which has about $30 billion in emerging market stocks. ``Now it's going the other way.'' United Co. Rusal's Deripaska, 40, the richest Russian on the list, lost more than $16 billion and in the past week ceded stakes in Hochtief AG and Magna International Inc. Chelsea FC owner and Evraz Group SA shareholder Abramovich, 41, lost $20 billion, based on assets excluding property and cash. Lisin's Losses The biggest loser has been Vladimir Lisin, 52, an avid hunter and head of Russia's Shooting Club, whose 85 percent stake in OAO Novolipetsk Steel lost $22 billion in value in the period. Novolipetsk rival Evraz declined 83 percent, shrinking 49- year-old founder Alexander Ambramov's fortune to $2.2 billion from $13.4 billion. Russia's biggest steelmaker, OAO Severstal, also fell, cutting the wealth of chief executive officer and majority owner Alexei Mordashov, 43, to $5.3 billion. ``They should take us all off the Forbes list,'' said Alexander Lebedev, ranked 39th by the magazine in May with $3.1 billion of wealth. Lebedev, 49, who owns 30 percent of state-run airline OAO Aeroflot, said in an interview on Sept. 23 that ``silly'' rhetoric by the Kremlin over the conflict in Georgia was responsible for 40 percent of the stock market's drop in August. Lukoil, Alfa OAO Lukoil Chief Executive Officer Vagit Alekperov, 58, saw his 20 percent stake in Russia's second-biggest oil producer decline to $7.2 billion from $19.5 billion. The fortune of Alekperov deputy Leonid Fedun, 52, declined to $3 billion from $8.4 billion. Both men have said they will continue to buy more Lukoil shares. Dmitry Rybolovlev, 41, who controls OAO Uralkali and owns 20 percent of OAO Silvinit, the country's only potash producers, lost about $12.8 billion, leaving him with $4.1 billion. Alfa Group partners Mikhail Fridman, 44, German Khan, 46, and Alexei Kousmichoff, 45, ranked seventh, 10th and 17th, respectively, lost at least a combined $12.1 billion. Alfa's shareholdings include BP Plc's Russian oil venture TNK-BP, mobile-phone operators OAO VimpelCom and Turkey's Turkcell Iletisim Hizmetleri AS, supermarket chain X5 Retail Group and television broadcaster CTC Media Inc. Spokespeople for companies including Deripaska's Basic Element, Evraz, Nikolai Tsvetkov's UralSib Financial Corp. and Rybolovlev's Uralkali declined to comment on the losses. Cashing Out At least one of Russia's wealthiest got out in time. Mikhail Prokhorov, 43, sold his 25 percent stake in OAO GMK Norilsk Nickel to Deripaska's Rusal for an undisclosed amount in April, just before nickel prices began to slump. The value of that stake plummeted from $13 billion on April 24 to $3.38 billion on Oct. 6. Prokhorov received $7 billion in cash as part of the Norilsk transaction, the Kommersant and Vedomosti newspapers reported then, citing unidentified people familiar with the deal. ``Are you criticizing me for feasting amid the Black Death,'' Prokhorov joked with reporters in Moscow on Sept. 30, after buying half of Renaissance Capital for $500 million. That was less than a quarter of the value the investment bank had a year ago when VTB Group sought to take it over, according to a Vedemosti report. ``Crisis time is a peak for opportunities,'' Prokhorov said. ``An absolute peak.'' Trading Delayed Russia's Micex and RTS stock exchanges delayed the opening of trading today on orders of the market regulator. It was unclear when trading would start, a spokesman for Micex said. The RTS won't resume stock trading until ``further notice,'' the bourse wrote in an e-mailed statement. ``You can now buy the free float of the entire Russian energy sector with the market cap of Coca-Cola, and still have change to buy all the Russian banks,'' Merrill Lynch & Co. emerging markets equity strategist Michael Hartnett said in a note to clients today. The unprecedented loss of wealth may set the stage for a new round of asset redistribution, said Pavel Teplukhin, president of Troika Dialog Asset Management in Moscow. ``We've seen quite a significant inflow of fresh money by our wealthy individuals to acquire at these very attractive levels that we haven't seen since 2003, 2004,'' Teplukhin said in a Bloomberg Television interview on Oct. 9, a day the Micex Index climbed 9.8 percent. Next Round The next round of wealth building may be the most intense yet, according to Renaissance Capital. The first came between 1995 and 1998 as Russia's first president, the late Boris Yeltsin, agreed to sell stakes in the nation's biggest industrial assets in return for loans from bankers including Potanin, who helped organize the state bailout. ``It will be a game with bigger stakes than in early 1990s privatizations and the redistribution after the 1998 crisis,'' said David Aserkoff, chief strategist for Russia at Moscow-based Renaissance Capital. ``Oligarchs with cash will be able to use their knowledge of the business and political landscape to find the next billions,'' Aserkoff said in a research report on Oct. 6. ``The market will grow back,'' billionaire Viktor Vekselberg, 51, one of BP Plc's four partners in oil company TNK-BP and founder of Renova Group, told reporters yesterday. ``The only issue is when. I don't think it will be soon.'' Aserkoff said in a research report on Oct. 6. ``The market will grow back,'' billionaire Viktor Vekselberg, 51, one of BP Plc's four partners in oil company TNK-BP and founder of Renova Group, told reporters yesterday. ``The only issue is when. I don't think it will be soon.''

(написано анонимно) 27.10.2008 13:29 (#)

А что коричневые фашисты тебе как глисту ближе:)?

Блэ-э-э на тэбэ.

(написано анонимно) 26.10.2008 19:32 (#)

чё вам лужок то сделал??? московия и так как глист присосавшаяся к России всё жирует и жирует, и чёто ещё не нравиться. Совсем маскали зажрались.

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Комаров_Владимир 27.10.2008 02:05 (#)

)))

Ага, зажрались особенно те "маскали" которые ещё недавно ими небыли.))))

(написано анонимно) 27.10.2008 02:23 (#)

Я как раз про них и говорю, типа переехали, прописку получили и считают себя пупами земли. Пупами я согласен, только с другой стороны и шуть шуть ниже(в районе копчика).

(написано анонимно) 27.10.2008 11:56 (#)

Суке

пошел на х. свидомый и дефолтный хохлосрачник.

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User vmbeliaev, 27.10.2008 12:02 (#)

Лужков от страха навонял

Лужков Пустил нашистских провокаторов с дымовыми шашками и отравляющими веществами

User virodovs, 31.10.2008 04:08 (#)

несколько иное мнение

несколько иное мнение Эта тема также обсуждается в другой странице, просто несколько иную точку зрения выразили http://multiboss.ru/?module=bc

User virodovs, 05.11.2008 22:33 (#)

Переводчик

самые быстрые Переводчики в сети http://multiboss.ru/?module=bc

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